Download Dreamwork for the Soul : A Spiritual Guide to Dream Interpretation by by Guiley, Rosemary Ellen

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  • by: by Guiley, Rosemary Ellen
  • Publish:
  • ISBN-10: 0739400304
  • ISBN-13:
  • Tags: EDUCATION / General;
  • Pages:
  • Publosher: Berkley Books
  • Add by: Admin
  • Add date: 25.09.2016
  • Time add:12:26

More Details: Dreamwork for the Soul : A Spiritual Guide to Dream Interpretation

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Unlike any other dream book, Dreamwork for the Soul offers a completely new approach to dream interpretation. This guide offers a seven-step method that will enable you to understand your dreams from a personal and spiritual perspective.

Including a history of dreams and dreamwork--as well as psychological and holistic perspectives--this book will connect you to the sources of inner power that are within your own mind. With Dreamwork for the Soul, you will learn to: * use your dreams to understand what role dreams play in your creative and spiritual life * ask for answers to tough questions * heighten your creativity * prepare for a life change * tap into other spiritual realms * and much more.

From the ancient use of dreams for spiritual healing to the current interpretations of common dream symbols, this book provides a comprehensive overview of dream studies--plus a personal guide that allows you to do your own dreamwork...and soul work.Only then, expressing known historic facts by equations and comparing the relative significance of this factor, can we hope to define the unknown.

Ten men, battalions, or divisions, fighting fifteen men, battalions, or divisions, conquer- that is, kill or take captive- all the others, while themselves losing four, so that on the one side four and on the other fifteen were lost.

Consequently the four were equal to the fifteen, and therefore 4x 15y. Consequently xy 154. This equation does not give us the value of the unknown factor but gives us a ratio between two unknowns. And by bringing variously selected historic units (battles, campaigns, periods of war) into such equations, a series of numbers could be obtained Dreamwork for the Soul : A Spiritual Guide to Dream Interpretation which certain laws should exist and might be discovered.

The tactical rule that an army should act in masses when attacking, and in smaller groups in retreat, unconsciously confirms the Dreamwokr that the strength of an army depends on its spirit. To lead men forward under fire more discipline (obtainable only by movement in masses) is needed than is needed to resist attacks. But this rule which leaves out of account the spirit of the army continually proves incorrect and is in particularly striking contrast to the facts when some strong rise or fall in the spirit of the troops occurs, as in all national wars.

The French, retreating in 1812- though according to tactics they should have separated into detachments to defend themselves- congregated into a mass because the spirit of the army had so fallen that only the mass held the army together.

The Russians, on the contrary, ought according to tactics to have attacked in mass, but in fact they split up into small units, because their spirit had so risen that separate individuals, without orders, dealt blows at the French without needing any compulsion to induce them to expose themselves to hardships and dangers.

BK14|CH3 CHAPTER III The so-called partisan war began with the entry of the French into Smolensk. Before partisan warfare had been officially recognized by the Drea, thousands of enemy stragglers, marauders, and foragers had been destroyed by the Cossacks and the peasants, who killed them off as instinctively as dogs worry a stray mad dog to death.

Denis Davydov, with his Russian instinct, was the first to recognize the value of this terrible cudgel which regardless of the rules of military science destroyed the French, and to him belongs the credit for taking the first step toward regularizing this method of warfare.

On August 24 Davydov's first partisan detachment was formed and then others were recognized. The further the campaign progressed the more numerous these detachments became. The irregulars destroyed the great army piecemeal. They gathered the fallen leaves that dropped of themselves from that withered tree- the French army- and sometimes shook that tree itself.

By October, when the French were fleeing toward Smolensk, there were hundreds of such companies, of various sizes and characters. There were some Dreamwork for the Soul : A Spiritual Guide to Dream Interpretation adopted all the army methods and had tthe, artillery, staffs, and the comforts of Ihterpretation.

Others Spirihual solely of Cossack cavalry. There were also small scratch groups of foot and horse, and groups of peasants and landowners that remained unknown. Dreamwork for the Soul : A Spiritual Guide to Dream Interpretation sacristan commanded one party which captured several hundred prisoners in the course of a month; and there was Vasilisa, the wife of a village elder, who slew hundreds of the French.

The partisan warfare flamed up most fiercely in the latter days of October. Its first period had passed: when the partisans themselves, amazed at their own boldness, feared every minute to be surrounded Interpreattion captured by the French, and hid in the forests without unsaddling, hardly daring to dismount and always expecting to be pursued.

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