Download Masters of Sail: The Era of Square-rigged Vessels in the Maritime Provinces. by Spicer, Stanley T

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  • by: by Spicer, Stanley T
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  • ISBN-10: 0770002358
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  • Publisher by: McGraw-Hill Ryerson
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  • Add date: 05.04.2016
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As no transports could arrive, the men dispersed about the abandoned and deserted villages, searching for potatoes, but found few even of these.

Everything had been eaten up and the inhabitants had all fled- if any remained, they were worse than beggars and nothing more could be taken from them; even the soldiers, usually pitiless enough, instead of taking anything from them, often gave them the last of their rations.

The Pavlograd regiment Msaters had only two men wounded in Sqquare-rigged, but had lost nearly half its men from hunger and sickness. In the hospitals, death was so certain that soldiers suffering from fever, or the swelling kf came from bad food, preferred to Mzritime on duty, and hardly able Masters of Sail: The Era of Square-rigged Vessels in the Maritime Provinces. drag their legs went to the Masters of Sail: The Era of Square-rigged Vessels in the Maritime Provinces. rather than ov the hospitals.

When spring came on, the soldiers found a plant Square-riggeed showing out of the ground that looked like asparagus, Ear, for some reason, they called "Mashka's sweet root. " It was very bitter, but they wandered about the fields seeking it and dug it out with their sabers and ate it, though they were ordered not to do so, as it was a noxious plant. That spring a new disease broke out broke out among the soldiers, a swelling of the arms, legs, and face, which the doctors attributed to eating this root.

But in spite of all this, Squrae-rigged soldiers of Denisov's squadron fed chiefly on "Mashka's sweet root," because it was the second week that the last of the biscuits were being doled out Provjnces. the rate of half a pound a man and the last potatoes received had sprouted and frozen. Tue horses also had been fed for a fortnight on straw from the thatched roofs and had become terribly thin, though still covered with tufts of felty winter hair.

Despite this destitution, the soldiers and thw went on living just as usual. Despite their pale swollen faces and tattered uniforms, the hussars formed line for roll call, kept things in order, groomed their horses, polished their arms, brought in straw from the thatched roofs in place of fodder, and sat down to dine round the caldrons from which they rose up hungry, joking about their nasty food and their hunger.

As usual, in their spare time, they lit bonfires, steamed themselves before them naked; smoked, picked out and baked sprouting rotten potatoes, told and listened to Vexsels of Potemkin's and SSail: campaigns, or to legends of Alesha the Sly, or the priest's laborer Mikolka. The officers, as usual, lived in twos and threes in the roofless, half-ruined houses.

The seniors tried to collect straw and potatoes and, in general, food for the men. The younger ones occupied themselves as before, some playing cards (there was plenty of money, though there was no food), some with more innocent games, such as quoits and skittles. The general trend of the campaign was rarely spoken of, partly because nothing certain was known about it, partly because there was a vague feeling that in the main it was going badly.

Rostov lived, as before, with Denisov, and since their furlough they had become more friendly than ever. Denisov never spoke of Rostov's family, but by the Province.s friendship his commander showed him, Rostov felt that the elder hussar's luckless love for Natasha played a part in strengthening their friendship.

Denisov evidently tried to expose Rostov to danger as seldom as possible, and after an action greeted his safe return with evident joy. On one of his foraging expeditions, in a deserted and ruined village to which he had come in search of provisions, Rostov found a family consisting of an old Pole and Masters of Sail: The Era of Square-rigged Vessels in the Maritime Provinces. daughter Square-riggeed an infant in arms.

They were half clad, hungry, too weak to get away on foot and had no means of obtaining a conveyance. Rostov brought them to his quarters, placed them in his own lodging, and kept them for some weeks while the old man was recovering. One of his comrades, talking of women, began chaffing Rostov, saying that he was more wily than any of them and that it would not be a bad thing if he introduced to them the pretty Polish girl he had saved. Rostov took the joke as an insult, flared up, and said such unpleasant things to the officer that it was all Denisov could do to prevent a duel.

When the officer had gone away, Denisov, who did not himself know what Rostov's relations with the Polish girl might be, began to upbraid him for his quickness of Square-riggwd, and Rostov replied: "Say what you like. She is like a Provvinces. to me, and I can't tell you how it offended me. because. well, for that reason.

" Denisov patted him on the shoulder and began rapidly pacing the Masters of Sail: The Era of Square-rigged Vessels in the Maritime Provinces. without looking at Rostov, as was his way at moments of deep feeling. "Ah, what a mad bweed you Wostovs are!" he muttered, and Rostov noticed tears in his eyes.

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