Download Sketches of Persia 2 Volume Set: Sketches of Persia: From the Journals of a Traveller in the East: Volume 2 (Cambridge Library Collection - Travel, Middle East and Asia Minor) by by Malcolm, John

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  • by: by Malcolm, John
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  • ISBN-10: 1108028675
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  • Publisher by: Cambridge University Press
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  • Add date: 17.12.2016
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It's your own opposition that's calculated. It's malignant. " She had never uttered her worst thought to her husband before, and the sensation of hearing it was evidently new to Osmond. But he showed no surprise, and his coolness was apparently a proof that he had believed his wife would in fact be unable to resist for ever his ingenious endeavour to draw her out.

"It's all the more intense then," he answered. And he added almost as if he were giving her a friendly counsel: "This is a very important matter. " She recognized that; she was fully conscious of the weight of the occasion; Middle East and Asia Minor) knew that between them they had arrived at a crisis.

Its gravity made her careful; she said nothing, and he went on. "You say I've no reason. I have the very best. I dislike, from the bottom of my soul, what you intend to do. It's dishonourable; it's indelicate; it's indecent. Your cousin is nothing whatever to me, and I'm under no obligation to make concessions to him. I've already made the very handsomest.

Your relations with him, while he was here, kept me on pins and needles; but I let that pass, because from week to week I expected him to go. I've never liked him and he has never liked me.

That's why you like him-because he hates me," said Osmond with a quick, barely audible tremor in his voice. "I've an ideal of what my wife should do and should not do. She should not travel across Europe alone, in defiance of my deepest desire, to sit at the bedside of other men.

Your cousin's nothing to you; he's nothing to us. You smile most expressively when I talk about us, but I assure you that we, Mrs. Osmond, is all I know. I take our marriage seriously; you appear to have found a way of not doing so.

I'm not aware that we're divorced or separated; for me we're indissolubly united. You are nearer to me than any human creature, and I'm nearer to you. It may be a disagreeable proximity; it's one, at any rate, of our own deliberate making. You don't like to be reminded of that, I know; but I'm perfectly willing, because-because-" And he paused a moment, looking as if he had something to say which would be very much to the point. "Because I think we should accept the consequences of our actions, and what I value most in life is the honour of a thing!" He spoke gravely and almost gently; the accent of sarcasm had dropped out of his tone.

It had a gravity which checked his wife's quick emotion; the resolution with which she had entered the room found itself caught in a mesh of fine threads. His last words were not command, they constituted a kind of appeal; Sketches of Persia 2 Volume Set: Sketches of Persia: From the Journals of a Traveller in the East: Volume 2 (Cambridge Library Collection - Travel, though she felt that any expression of respect on his part could only be a refinement of egotism, they represented something transcendent and absolute, like the sign of the cross or the flag of one's country.

He spoke in the name of something sacred and precious-the observance of a magnificent form. They were as perfectly apart in feeling as two disillusioned lovers had ever been; but they had never yet separated in act.

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