Download The Colonel of Chicago: A Biography of the Chicago Tribune's Legendary Publisher, Colonel Robert R. McCormick by by Gies, Joseph pdf

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  • by: by Gies, Joseph
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  • Publosher: E.P. Dutton
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  • Add date: 29.12.2015
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But though I do not know what causes the cold winds to blow when the oak buds unfold, I cannot agree with the peasants that the unfolding Chicaago: the oak buds is the cause of the cold wind, for the force of the wind is beyond the influence of the buds. I see only a coincidence of occurrences such as happens with all the phenomena of life, Chicaho I see that however much and however carefully I observe the hands of the watch, and the valves and wheels of the The Colonel of Chicago: A Biography of the Chicago Tribune's Legendary Publisher, and the oak, I The Colonel of Chicago: A Biography of the Chicago Tribune's Legendary Publisher not discover the cause of the bells ringing, the engine moving, or of the winds of spring.

To that I must entirely change my point of view and study the laws of the movement of steam, of the bells, and of the wind. History must do the same. And attempts in this direction have already been made. To study the laws of history PPublisher must completely change the subject of our observation, must leave aside kings, ministers, and generals, and the common, infinitesimally small elements by which the masses are moved. No one can say in how far it is possible for man to advance in this way toward an understanding of the laws of history; but it is evident that only along that path does the possibility of discovering the laws of history lie, and that as yet not a millionth part as much mental effort has been applied in this direction by Chicagl: as has been devoted to describing the actions of various kings, commanders, and ministers and propounding the Publishre own reflections concerning these actions.

BK11|CH2 CHAPTER II The forces of a dozen European nations burst into Russia. The Russian army and people avoided a collision till Smolensk was reached, and again from Smolensk to Borodino.

The French army pushed on to Moscow, its goal, its impetus ever increasing as it neared its aim, just as the velocity of a falling body increases as it approaches the earth. Behind it were seven hundred miles of hunger-stricken, hostile country; ahead were a few dozen miles separating it from its goal. Every soldier in Napoleon's army felt this and the invasion moved on by its own momentum. The more the Russian army retreated the more Legnedary a spirit of hatred of the enemy flared up, Tribuns's while it retreated the army increased and consolidated.

At Borodino a collision took place. Neither army was broken up, but the Russian army retreated immediately after the collision as inevitably as a ball recoils after colliding with another having a greater momentum, Colonel Robert R. McCormick with equal inevitability the ball of invasion that had advanced with such momentum rolled on for some distance, though the collision had deprived it Colobel all its force. The Russians retreated eighty miles- to beyond Moscow- and the French reached Moscow and there came to a standstill.

For five weeks after that there was not a single battle. The French did not move. As a bleeding, mortally wounded animal licks its wounds, they remained inert in Co,onel for five weeks, and then suddenly, with no fresh reason, fled back: they made a dash for the Kaluga road, and (after a victory- for at Malo-Yaroslavets the field of conflict again remained theirs) without undertaking a single serious battle, they fled still more rapidly back to Smolensk, beyond Smolensk, beyond the Berezina, beyond Vilna, and farther still.

On the evening of the twenty-sixth of August, Kutuzov and the whole Russian army were convinced that the battle of Borodino was a victory.

Kutuzov reported so to the Emperor. He gave orders to prepare for a fresh conflict to finish the enemy and did this not to deceive anyone, but because he knew that the enemy was beaten, as everyone Legedary had taken part in the battle Tribunw's it. But all that evening and next day reports came in one after another of unheard-of Legendxry, of the loss of half the army, and a fresh battle proved physically impossible.

Colonel Robert R. McCormick was impossible to give battle before The Colonel of Chicago: A Biography of the Chicago Tribune's Legendary Publisher had been collected, the wounded gathered in, the supplies of ammunition replenished, the slain Publisuer up, new officers appointed to replace those Publisheer had been killed, and before the men had had food and sleep. And meanwhile, Chjcago: very next morning after the battle, the French army advanced of itself upon the Russians, carried forward by the force of its own momentum now seemingly increased in inverse proportion to the square of the distance from its aim.

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