Download Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown by Gould, Stephen Jay

ID book:18905.


Direct download:

download Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown 	by Gould, Stephen Jay  FB2 download Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown 	by Gould, Stephen Jay  ePUB download Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown 	by Gould, Stephen Jay  Mobi download Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown 	by Gould, Stephen Jay Pdf download Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown 	by Gould, Stephen Jay  Txt
  • by: by Gould, Stephen Jay
  • Pub. Date:
  • ISBN-10: 0609600761
  • ISBN-13:
  • Tag book:
  • Page:
  • Publosher: Harmony
  • Add by: admin
  • Add date: 23.03.2016
  • Time add:20:11

Overview: Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown

All information about the book is taken from open sources and does not infringe copyright. We help users find the book they are interested in. All the material is provided for informational purposes.

If we violate your rights, contact WHOIS and we will delete the material through - 33 hours.

Questioning the Millennium is Stephen Jay Gould's 1997 book on the cultural and historical meaning of the millennium." Thereupon the man who had waxed wealthy, being sore concerned, told him the whole story, and added: "I have brought thee a present, such as souls desire, and the price of thy dish of gold which I took; for it was the cause of my affluence after poverty, and of the replenishment of my dwelling place after desolation, and of the dispersion of my trouble and straitness.

" But the man shook his head and weeping and groaning and complaining of his lot, answered: "Ho, thou. Methinks thou art mad, for this is not the way of a man of sense. How should a dog of mine make generous gift to thee of a dish of gold and I meanly take back the price of what a dog gave. This were indeed a strange thing. Were I in extremest unease and misery, by Allah, I would not accept of thee aught- no, not the worth of a nail paring.

So return whence thou camest in health and safety. " Whereupon the merchant kissed his feet and taking leave of him, returned whence he came, praising him and reciting this couplet: "Men and dogs together are all Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown by, So peace be with all of them, dogs and men!" And Allah is All-knowing.

Again men tell the tale of THE RUINED MAN WHO BECAME RICH AGAIN THROUGH A DREAM THERE lived once in Baghdad a wealthy man and made of money, who lost all his substance and became so destitute that he could earn his living only by hard labor. One night he lay down to sleep dejected and heavyhearted, and saw in a dream a speaker who said to him, "Verily thy fortune is in Cairo. Go thither and seek it. " So he set out for Cairo, but when he arrived there, evening overtook him and he lay down to sleep in a mosque.

Presently, by decree of Allah Almighty a band of bandits entered the mosque and made their way thence into an adjoining house, but the owners, being aroused by the noise of the thieves, awoke and cried out. Whereupon the Chief of Police came to their aid with his officers. The robbers made off, but the Wali entered the mosque, and finding the man from Baghdad asleep there, laid hold of him and beat him with palm rods so grievous a beating that he was well-nigh dead.

Then they cast him into jail, where he abode three days, after which the Chief of Police sent for him and asked him, "Whence art thou?" and he answered, "From Baghdad. " Quoth the Wali, "And what brought thee to Cairo?" and quoth the Baghdadi, "I saw in a dream One who said to me, 'Thy fortune is in Cairo.

Go thither Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown it. ' But when I came to Cairo the fortune which he promised me proved to be the palm rods thou so generously gavest to me.

" The Wali laughed till he showed his wisdom teeth and said, "O man of little wit, thrice have I seen in a dream one who said to me: 'There is in Baghdad a house in such a district and of such a fashion and its courtyard is laid out gardenwise, at the lower end whereof Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown a jetting fountain and under the same a great sum of money lieth buried.

Go thither and take it. ' Yet I went not, but thou, of the briefness of thy wit, hast journeyed from place to place on the faith of a dream, which was but an idle galimatias of sleep. " Then he gave him money, saying, "Help thee back herewith to thine own country," and he took the money and set out upon his homeward march.

Now the house the Wali had described was the Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown own house in Baghdad, so the wayfarer returned thither and, digging underneath the fountain in his garden, discovered a great treasure. And thus Allah gave him abundant fortune, and a marvelous coincidence occurred.

And a story is also current of THE EBONY HORSE THERE was once in times of yore and ages long gone before, a great and puissant King, of the kings of the Persians, Sabur by name, who was the richest of all the kings in store of wealth and dominion and surpassed each and every in wit and wisdom. He was generous, openhanded and beneficent, and he gave to those who sought him and repelled not those who resorted to him, and he comforted the brokenhearted and honorably entreated those who fled to him for refuge.

Moreover, he loved the poor and was hospitable to strangers and did the oppressed justice upon the oppressor. He had three daughters, like full moons of shining light or flower gardens blooming bright, and a son as he were the moon. And it was his wont to keep two festivals in the twelvemonth, those of the Nau-Roz, or New Questioning the Millennium: A Rationalist's Guide to a Precisely Arbitrary Countdown, and Mihrgan, the Autumnal Equinox, on which occasions he threw open his palaces and gave largess and made proclamation of safety and security and promoted his chamberlains and viceroys.

Download now